Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    ilford
    Posts
    60

    WORK EXPERIENCE SHOCK HORROR!

    After doing only my first day of work experince at an EMI unit (Elderly Mentally Infirm Centre) I'm seriously condering whether I'm the right sort of person to become a doctor.

    That place was jam packed with people 75+ years old who were suffering from predomintantly Parkinson's, dementia, and Alschiemer's diease and it was just scary, no other word to describe it. The smell of the place was nasty, the shouts and screams of people who were just completely being ignored seemed really wrong (the wardens and nurses ignore them becasue they are always exclaiming becasue of their mental problems), and the helplessness of the people was a real shocking eye-opener.

    I had to feed an old women breakfast, and even this simple tasked was hard, I kept panicing about whether she would end up chocking on her cornflakes and die, others wet themselves, I was offered to sponge bath others (which I imediately declined), and they were all constantly muttering and mummbling which kept me on edge through the two longest hours of my life.

    The guy after goes if I can't handle this I shouldn't become a doctor and I so agree, I now realise why they (doctors) get paided a descent salary and are really respected. Word of advice if you are considering becoming a doctor get in touch with your local EMI unit and see if you can stick it out, because this sort work experience provides valuable contact.

    I doubt I'll go back, I'll just stick to doing a biomedical science degree thank you very much.



  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    567
    And there I was thinking you were going to do a physiology degree and PhD for the money... :?

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Location schmocation...
    Posts
    649
    I've had to help people shower before (which actually isn't that bad. I thought the worst part was getting my trousers soaking wet and people thinking I had actually... well, you get the picture). I've also fed people before. It really isn't that bad. It gets much better just soften the food up a bit if you worry they will choke, or put everything into a food mixer!

    And yes, if you become a doctor, quite a few of your patients will prob. be old (unless you work in Paediatrics) and there are more people over 65 now than people who are under 16 (my point being that there are more and more elderly people).

    I say go back to the EMI. I bet by the end of the week you'll actually enjoy it. I didn't pursue WEx at an EMI, but something sort of similar. I had great fun :mrgreen: hence am now putting forward my application to become a doctor! ppplleeeaaasssee, someone accept me!!!

    Have fun
    :lol:
    Mais, vrai j'ai trop pleuré. Les aubes sont navrantes. Les étoiles sont belles, a cause d'une fleur que l'on ne voit pas.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Gizmo says -'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Currently jus below ya nose, macca (hehehe.... ;) )
    Posts
    11,032
    your first impressions can be misleading mind...I been working here in our local Geriatrics ward for months and it as easy as pie .... but I remeber the first day wuz 'whatthe***?', you know?
    Dont worry about it - you acclimatise to it...
    "...reminds me of childhood memories,
    when
    Everything was as bright as the bluest skies.."


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dqVDQ-lF4Q

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    39
    You ought to be able to handle things like that when you're a doctor.
    When I shadowed in my local A&E the SHO had to check the back passage of an invidual who came in with an intestinal blockage, and she prodded at the oozing ulcer another had on his groin. :?
    There are only two football teams in Liverpool, Liverpool and Liverpool reserves (Bill Shankly)

  6. #6
    Member Tinkerbell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Londonnnn/Southampton
    Posts
    190
    yep.. but different experiences affect people in different ways.. maybe even after this 100th day, 'Grey' will still not wanna do medicine..

    i mean.. i did my work ex in pakistan.. and they're not so strict there, so i was allowed to hang around in operating theatres (as long as i scrubbed up ofcourse) and i saw all sorts of scaryness.. on my first day.they operated on this kid.. and he had no groin or somethin..so it was a big surgery.. and they sliced him open and started prodding around inside him! (the surgeon doing it had been nicknamed by other students as 'The Butcher!'.. so.. he wasnt too nice about and gentle about it!)

    anyways, it was horrible.. his intestines and everything imaginable was hanging out in front of me.. and.. well.. i fainted. there and then! (lol.. only to go back in ten minutes after!).. but the moral being... i went back.. again and again.. and found that being a doctor is what i want more then anything, even though at first.. i thought "what the hell am i doin hereee?? arrghh! .. so try going back..

    u never know.. might not be so bad after all.. and plus.. i;m sure theres more to being a doc than scrubbin old peoples behinds! :wink:

    wateva u decide,, good luck.. x
    "Go easy on yourself, for the outcome of all affairs is determined by The Lords' decree. If something is meant to go elsewhere, it will never come your way, but if it is yours by destiny, from it you cannot flee"

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    london
    Posts
    130
    Gosh I remember even being shocked at how ill people actually were on my first day and all the other stuff too...but I kind of got hooked on it and now can't help myself! (hope I'm not some sicko).

    Anyway, has anyone come across the sluice room? Thats one I still can't get used to. It has this big circular hole in it where you throw the contents of the commodes...and yes, I have even been given that wonderful duty...well, I said I wanted to get involved and help out the nurses!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Gizmo says -'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Currently jus below ya nose, macca (hehehe.... ;) )
    Posts
    11,032
    the good feelin you get outtas helping someone far outwieghs the orrible bits, dont it? (apart from the sluice room hehe!)

    Maybe grey you just dont want to do it at this time in your life ? you can always do healthcare later if there iz something other ambition burning in ya.... just make sure ya get those A level grades, matey.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    79
    Oh grey!

    That was ONE field of medicine. Yes, it's hard to see peoplew with Alzheimer's, and dementia, but sadly, those will be your patients as a doctor. Doctors are there to help them.

    You could always look at other fields, like pathology, plastic surgery, radiology to name a few...

    But it is up to you. When I first did dent experience, I was like 'what NASTY gnashers!' but you get used to it. I mean, the patients had mouts, just like I had one. And care and neglect made or broke those mouths. So, for me it was always rewarding to see my dad manually fix problems, such as root canal treatments, composite feelings, take impressions to form bridges. My favourite view though was seeing him do Orthodontics! The art of tooth correction really looks appealing to me. I may conisder that as a post-graduate if I'm still ambitious in 5 years' time!

    Licketysplit
    Messy, messy, messy!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2