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  1. #21
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    Wink Odp!

    Quote Originally Posted by correction_centre
    Absolutely.
    By the way, I decided to go for ODP rather than nurse training (even though you advised to do it the otherway round!) and I've got an offer to start in September at Huddersfield - I'm frantically trying to sort out my finances before the course starts! I'm actually quite nervous and excited about the whole thing and it's still 6 months away!

    I am studying at University of Huddersfield working at Calderdale Royal as Student ODP! It was the best thing I ever did!!!! Nothing to be nervous about it's fabulous!
    May I rest in peace????



  2. #22
    Junior Member lucyfrombristol's Avatar
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    Fair enough andy2, I take your point
    Bristol Year 5 (GEP Year 4)

  3. #23
    Junior Member african_anesthetist's Avatar
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    listen Andy2...
    I remember that there was a time when people had to study Medicine and then specilize in Pharmacy or Dentestry.. but now they are seprate medical fields.. I trully believe that the same could happen with Anesthesia... It could be an Anesthetic practitioner programm..
    But who knows waht could happen in 20-30 years.

  4. #24
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    It sounds like sour grapes from Andy2 - a very backwards point of view. Still, I can understand why he wants to protect his own profession and investment in medical school training. However, the new anaesthetic practioner program isn't about undermining medically qualified anaesthetists, but rather improving their work by delegating tasks to practioners working under their supervision.

    It's completely out of order to write off a whole new group of people because they haven't taken the traditional route through medical school. Andy2 knows nothing about potential candidates aptitude or academic ability. Many clever and able people choose not to go to medical school for their own reasons. This shouldn't stop them undertaking specialist training if they are capable of succeeding and the training program offers the correct level of education and practice.

  5. #25
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    I totally agree with you correction_centre. See you at Hudd on your first day!
    May I rest in peace????

  6. #26
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    hi Paula,
    you have mail.......!

  7. #27
    Member andy2's Avatar
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    sour grapes?? I don't see non-medical anaesthetists as a threat to me, I can train in Anaesthetics if I want to and the presence or absence of NMAs won't alter this. This has nothing to do with aptitude or intelligence -you don't need to be particularly bright to be a doctor you just need to work hard. Most nurses could do the medical course without much difficulty and most would make excellent doctors. The importance of medical training is not as a measure of intellectual ability but training in a way of thought, a grounding in human biology and an understanding of how disease affects it - this then enables you to practice the specialties of medicine safely. Anaesthesia is far more than a technical ability to give anaesthetics and the best anaesthetists I know are excellent physicians as well.

    This is not about protectionism its about safe, effective, efficient practice. So far when nurses have been used to replace SHOs they are no better in terms of outcomes despite operating in somewhat constrained circumstances, slower than medics, more expensive and arrange more tests/follow-up. I see no advantage to using NMAs, frankly if you want to be an anaethtist go to med school, train to be a Dr and then do anaesthetics. If you don't find your current career rewarding enough I'm sorry. If you want to be an architect go to architects' school, you want to be a pilot go to pilots school, you want to be an anaesthetist go to med school.

    And as a foot note pharmacists were never doctors but developed from apothecaries -some of whom were dual trained in medicine and dentists came from barber-surgeons. Don't kid yourselves that anaesthesia consultants will ever come from non-medical backgrounds.

  8. #28
    Member andy2's Avatar
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    anaesthetists are generally a more enjoyable bunch of medics to be around than many, although the air of smugness brought on by hauling other specialties out of s**t can be tiresome. Patient safety is, however, no laughing matter.
    Enjoy your ODP training, every good anaesthetist deserves a good ODP........................and every bad anaesthetist needs one.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy2

    This is not about protectionism its about safe, effective, efficient practice. So far when nurses have been used to replace SHOs they are no better in terms of outcomes despite operating in somewhat constrained circumstances, slower than medics, more expensive and arrange more tests/follow-up. I see no advantage to using NMAs, frankly if you want to be an anaethtist go to med school, train to be a Dr and then do anaesthetics. If you don't find your current career rewarding enough I'm sorry. If you want to be an architect go to architects' school, you want to be a pilot go to pilots school, you want to be an anaesthetist go to med school.
    Andy2 - yet again you're demonstrating constrained thinking - is this what medical school taught you to do? Your comments regarding nurses ("slower than medics"?) are offensive (and I'm not even a nurse) and irrelevant with regards to the Anaesthetic Practioner role. And I don't recall anyone here mentioning practioners becoming consultants - where did you get that one from? We're talking about suitable people being given suitable training (under the guidance of the Royal College of Anaethetists) to do a specific job.

    The accepted way is not always the only way (my years of experience outside of the hospital taught me that one).

  10. #30
    Senior Member Manpreet_Singh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weegie neurosurgeon
    Of course we all know that anaesthetists are dour faced people who would rather sit and do the times crossword rather than pay attention to the patient whose being operated on.

    Maybe they should put something in their continuing professional development plans which would read as "need to develop a sense of humour" followed by "must develop an attention span of more than 3 seconds"!
    If your being serious then this is a myth. Anaesthetics is a dynamic expanding speciality with a wide variety of fascinating patient care. Involvements in anaesthesia have facilitated the expansion of surgery so that no part of the body is inaccessible and no operation too major to complete.

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