Page 11 of 12 FirstFirst ... 9101112 LastLast
Results 101 to 110 of 116
  1. #101
    Senior Member Varied A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    946
    If you read beyond the title you'd see that the target group was vulnerable, elderly patients. These patients often put huge faith in doctors and nurses, and as a result assume that anything they do is excellent. Repeat it in a younger, more assertive and less trusting cohort and you would likely get completely different results.

    The study also says care is optimum when it follows guidelines and recommendations - as you have already so vocally said, that doesn't always produce the best care

    Finally - nobody in this thread has suggested that good patient satisfaction can or should mask a poor medical outcome. It's an added extra which can be very beneficial in terms of the practitioner-patient relationship.
    John

    Mark:- Dr Carter, you seen Dr Weaver?
    Carter:- err usually she's everywhere



  2. #102
    Member andy2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    119
    no, but every study (with the exception of Ezra's piss poor EMJ piece) has used this as a measure of outcomes - NPs produce higher satisfaction. However as these studies are not powered to look at realisitic differences in outcomes -so the conclusion that outcomes are the same is at high risk of being a type two error due to inadequet powering of study.

  3. #103
    Junior Member paris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr John Crippen
    Ah, but you oversimplify.

    This is know in the jargon as "the skills escalator". Actually, when I was a houseman, I did take all the bloods and put in all the cannulae and so on...

    You are missing the most important point. Nurses who do nursing are not treated with respect and are badly paid. So, to improve themselves, they have to leave nursing and become NPs and NSs.

    All well and good.

    Who does the nursing?

    People are dying from lack of nursing care, whilst over promoted nurse-specialists run round the hospital with their clipboards and their protocols, generally pissing eveyone off by telling them how to do their jobs. In the meantime, patients are getting Grade IV pressure sores.


    Dr John Crippen

    NHS BLOG DOCTOR
    I think it seem like you had a bad experience with CNS. What you are saying is an insult to them and when you are referring to CNS “pissing everyone off by telling how to do their job”. I think this is because you are threatened the fact that you have been challenged by the CNS and you don't like it.

  4. #104
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,412
    Quote Originally Posted by Varied A
    The study also says care is optimum when it follows guidelines and recommendations - as you have already so vocally said, that doesn't always produce the best care
    I suppose it varies on who is making the decision not to follow the guidelines, and their knowledge, reasoning and qualification to do so

  5. #105
    Senior Member Varied A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    946
    Quote Originally Posted by yazoo
    I suppose it varies on who is making the decision not to follow the guidelines, and their knowledge, reasoning and qualification to do so
    Indeed it is, and that person can be a doctor, nurse, physio, or a whole range of others
    John

    Mark:- Dr Carter, you seen Dr Weaver?
    Carter:- err usually she's everywhere

  6. #106
    Member andy2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    119
    Thought I'd reserect an old thread - Lucy's original argument was that it was difficult to find doctors to fill anaesthetic posts. With MMC nearly upon us it is clear that significant portions of current anaestheic trainees are going to be denied the chance to complete their training.

    So do we really needs APs?

    www.mmcdiscussion.org

  7. #107
    Member andy2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    119
    3 years after this thread was started the AP program, in England at least, appears to have run into the ground. Sadly I fear it was a financial decision to scrap it, however the relative expense, inflexability and limited role of APs compared to even junior medical anaesthetists has conspired to bring down this experiment.

    For the record, I feel genuinely sorry for those who have undertaken the training and are now likely to find their employment opportunities severely constrained. I'm sorry you were sold a sop. If the fire to be an anaesthetist still burns graduate medical school may be a way to further your ambitions. My feelings on APs aside, I feel those who entered this program have been shabbily treated as guniea pigs by a government who have singularly failed to understand the complexities of the NHS and medical treatment.

    http://www.aagbi.org/pressoffice/sta...onersfeb06.htm

  8. #108
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1

Page 11 of 12 FirstFirst ... 9101112 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2